Login or Register to make a submission.

Submission Preparation Checklist

As part of the submission process, authors are required to check off their submission's compliance with all of the following items, and submissions may be returned to authors that do not adhere to these guidelines.
  • Articles submitted must be original, research-based, never published before and not in the process of review that may be published in other publications.
  • Articles have been written in standard English and Arabic with a space of 1.5 with the size of the Garamond font size 12 in A4 sized paper using the Microsoft Word format (doc or docx). Articles must be sent through the Article Submission menu with article lengths of 5,000 to 10,000 words
  • Articles have complied with writing and bibliographic rules contained in the writing rules (Author Guidelines).
  • The submission has not been previously published, nor is it before another journal for consideration (or an explanation has been provided in Comments to the Editor).
  • The submission file is in OpenOffice, Microsoft Word, or RTF document file format.
  • Where available, URLs for the references have been provided.

Author Guidelines

AUTHOR GUIDELINES

In general, the structure of writing JIEP scientific articles (The Journal of Islamic Economics Perspectives) is organized into three parts, namely the beginning, discussion, and conclusion. In the first part (1), the article must include the title, name and affiliation, abstract, and keywords. The title is made by taking into account the economic principles of the word, denotative diction, and of course, must reflect the contents of the article. Name and affiliation refer to the author's name, the original institution, and e-mail address. Abstracts are arranged in English with a range of 75-100 words. On keywords, a maximum of six words is listed which are the main topics of the article.

Meanwhile, in the discussion section (2), each article is organized into two different models depending on the writing category. ِِِ As a concept of scientific writing, this writing is organized into three sub-sections, namely introduction, discussion, and closing. In the introduction, the article is broken down into the context of the subject of study (concept or discourse) and its relevance in the development of related disciplines; followed by a sub-discussion that reviews all themes or problems that support the details of the research subject along with the probability of the consequences; and then concludes with sub-conclusions which reveal conclusions and their implications for theory and practice and a number of important recommendations related to the development of discourse in the related scientific domain. Then, especially for articles categorized as research results, both library research and field research, the IMRaD model is used as a writing structure. IMRaD is a general organizational structure in scientific writing for academic journals consisting of four subsections, namely introduction, study methods, research results, and discussion. In the sub-introduction, articles must reveal the entire context of the study, starting from the reason why the analysis unit (subject or object of research) is interesting and important to learn, the main problem (research question), hypothesis, to the purpose and significance of the study. Then, in the research sub-method, articles must reveal all the methods used and how the operations are applied in the assessment. Specifically for the types of research results, this sub-section must also be disclosed when and where research is conducted, who are the parties involved, and what data is used. Furthermore, in the sub-results of the study, articles must show and review all research findings that are treated as an attempt to answer the problem proposal. Finally, in a further sub discussion which is the concluding part, the article must reveal a number of conclusions, theoretical implications, limitations of research, and a number of recommendations that can be followed up by reviewers or subsequent researchers to develop the future. research result. Of course, all categories of articles, both reviews of papers and research papers, must be able to show novelty in the findings.

As for the final part (3), each article must be closed with the inclusion of all the references referred to in the assessment. The bibliography is written using the Turabian style pattern (See JIEP's Writing Guidelines).

Articles that are submitted must be original, research-based, never published and not in the process of review that may be published in other publications.

1. Articles are written in standard English or Arabic with a space of 1.5 with a size 12 Garamond font on A4 sized paper using the Microsoft Word format (doc or Docx). Articles must be sent through the Article Submission menu with article lengths of 5,000 to 7,000 words. The manuscript should be in no less than 25 pages long
2. Structure of the manuscripts

a. Title. The title should be brief, short, clear, and informative which reflect the article content. The length of the title maximum of 12 words. Each word of the title should be started with a capitalized letter.
b. Author’s names and institutions. The author’s names should be accompanied by the author’s institutions, affiliation address and email addresses, without any academic titles and/or job title.
c. Abstract. The abstract should be less than 200 words. Abstract contains a clear statement of the background of the study, the purpose of the study, method, result, and implication, with no references cited. Keywords should be 2 to 5 phrases.
d. Introduction. The introduction describes a brief background of the novelty, state of the arts, and objective (s). It should be written efficiently and supported by references. It should be written without numbers and/or pointers.
e. Literature Review. This section explains the theoretical framework used in this research, a review of the previous research in the area.
f. Methods. This section describes the tools of analysis along with the data and their sources.
g. Result and Discussion. This section explains the results of the study. Data should be presented in Tables or Figures when feasible. There should be no duplication of data in Tables and Figures. The discussion should be consistent and should interpret the results clearly and concisely, and their significance, supported by the suitable literature. The discussion should show relevance between the result and the field of investigation and/or hypotheses. The discussion also should compare the result with previous research.
h. Conclusions. This section concludes and provides policy implications, if any, of the study.
i. Acknowledgment (if any) to the person(s) or institution(s) who help the experiment should be stated.
j. References. This section lists only the papers, books, or other types of publications referred to in the manuscript. References should be the last 10-year publication with minimum of 80% of the journal. References should be listed alphabetically by the author(s) last name(s) and the year of publication. We suggest authors to use reference management software like EndNote, Mendeley, Zotero, etc., to prepare citations and the list of references.

3. All entries will be reviewed by an editorial board and language editor team, by the peer-review mechanism. Articles that do not comply with the provisions of the theme, format, and length of the article will be rejected without going through the review process.

4. Articles sent must include abstracts of 150-200 words and at least 4- 5 keywords.

5. A citation must use footnotes and references that refer to the Chicago Manual of Style 16th edition (full note) format. Articles whose is made using Mendeley or Zotero citation software are preferred.

6. All articles must be submitted through the Submit Article menu.

7. Tables and figures should be presented as follows:

a. The name of tables and figures should follow a numbering system (Arabic numbering system). The names of the tables and figures are on the top of the tables and figures.
b.The tables and figures should provide the source of information, if any, at the bottom part of both.
c.Table format should contain only heading and contents. Please provide the top and bottom lines, along with the line(s) that separate the heading and the contents. Example:

8. Arabic transliteration uses the Times New Arabic font and Transliteration McGill University with the following references:

9. Writing footnotes and bibliography follows the following references: (using the Chicago Manual of Style 16th edition (full note) style, and has been created using Mendeley or Zotero citation software.)

 Writing footnotes

Nur Hidayat, “The Contribution of Nusantara Moslem Local Tradition on Micro Finance Risk Management in Indonesia,” International Journal of Islamic Business and Economics (IJIBEC), January 26, 2018, 77, doi:10.28918/ijibec.v1i2.996.

 Angelo M. Venardos, ed., Current Issues in Islamic Banking and Finance: Resilience and Stability in the Present System (Singapore ; Hackensack, NJ: World Scientific, 2010).

Saheed Abdullahi Busari and Sikiru Olanrewaju Aminu, “The Application of Ar-Rahan-Based Microcredit Facility as an Alternative Instrument for Poverty Alleviation in Nigeria,” Journal of Islamic Finance 6, no. 1 (January 2017): 51–64, doi:10.12816/0042733.

Nur Hidayat and Aprilya Fitriani, Gurihnya Pembiayaan Kulinar Di Indonesia (Yogyakarta: Q-Media, 2019).

References

Journal References

Brounen, Dirk, Kees G. Koedijk, and Rachel A.J. Pownall. “Household Financial Planning and Savings Behavior.” Journal of International Money and Finance 69 (December 2016): 95–107. doi:10.1016/j.jimonfin.2016.06.011.

Busari, Saheed Abdullahi, and Sikiru Olanrewaju Aminu. “The Application of Ar-Rahan-Based Microcredit Facility as an Alternative Instrument for Poverty Alleviation in Nigeria.” Journal of Islamic Finance 6, no. 1 (January 2017): 51–64. doi:10.12816/0042733.

Eriksson, Kent, and Cecilia Hermansson. “Searching for New Saving Behavior Theories: How Relationships between Banks’ Customers and Advisors Affect Household Saving.” International Journal of Bank Marketing 32, no. 4 (May 27, 2014): 279–99. doi:10.1108/IJBM-03-2014-0040.

Fisher, Patti J., and Rui Yao. “Gender Differences in Financial Risk Tolerance.” Journal of Economic Psychology (August 2017): 191–202. doi:10.1016/j.joep.2017.03.006.

Moeller, Lioudmila, and Vladislav Valentinov. “The Commercialization of the Nonprofit Sector: A General Systems Theory Perspective.” Systemic Practice and Action Research 25, no. 4 (August 2012): 365–70. doi:10.1007/s11213-011-9226-4.

Book References, the format should follow the following example:

Brounen, Dirk, Kees G. Koedijk, and Rachel A.J. Pownall. “Household Financial Planning and Savings Behavior.” Journal of International Money and Finance 69 (December 2016): 95–107.

Busari, Saheed Abdullahi, and Sikiru Olanrewaju Aminu. “The Application of Ar-Rahan-Based Microcredit Facility as an Alternative Instrument for Poverty Alleviation in Nigeria.” Journal of Islamic Finance 6, no. 1 (January 2017): 51–64

Eriksson, Kent, and Cecilia Hermansson. “Searching for New Saving Behavior Theories: How Relationships between Banks’ Customers and Advisors Affect Household Saving.” International Journal of Bank Marketing 32, no. 4 (May 27, 2014): 279–99.

Fisher, Patti J., and Rui Yao. “Gender Differences in Financial Risk Tolerance.” Journal of Economic Psychology 61 (August 2017): 191–202.

Moeller, Lioudmila, and Vladislav Valentinov. “The Commercialization of the Nonprofit Sector: A General Systems Theory Perspective.” Systemic Practice and Action Research 25, no. 4 (August 2012): 365–70.

 

Privacy Statement

The names and email addresses entered in this journal site will be used exclusively for the stated purposes of this journal and will not be made available for any other purpose or to any other party.